Prize Money At The 2022 FIFA World Cup in Qatar

Prize Money At The 2022 FIFA World Cup in Qatar

There will be plenty of money on the Prize Money At The 2022 FIFA World Cup in Qatar. While the focus for most teams will be on lifting the iconic trophy and representing their nations well, there is definitely a tangible benefit for success on the pitch. FIFA haven’t held back when it comes to prize money for World Cups in recent years, and 2022 is no different — with huge sums up for grabs. Here, The Sporting News breaks down the prize money on offer in Qatar and how much each team can win.

Total prize money at the 2022 World Cup

FIFA have allocated $440 million in prize money for the 2022 World Cup in Qatar. While a very significant sum, FIFA have a revenue budget of $4.6 billion in 2022, with broadcasting rights set to contribute $2.6 billion alone in income.

How much prize money will the 2022 World Cup winners get?

FIFA confirmed in April 2022 that the Qatar World Cup champions will receive a record $42 million in prize money. Prior to 2006, World Cup-winning teams never pocketed more than $10m, with 1982 champions Italy walking away ‘only’ with an estimated $2.2m for their efforts.

How much money will each team make at the 2022 World Cup?

With so much prize money on offer, every side will walk away from Qatar significantly richer. Simply qualifying for the 2022 World Cup sees each team paid a $1.5 million participation fee. But once at the tournament, sides can make much larger sums by progressing through the knockout stages. FIFA have previously announced that $60 million in total prize money will be up for grabs at the 2023 Women’s World Cup in Australia and New Zealand.

The ABC reported in July that FIFA could further increase the prize money on offer at the 2023 Women’s World Cup, with a figure of $100m mentioned. In May, the United States men’s and women’s teams agreed that they would share the combined prize money they each won at the 2022 and 2023 World Cups.

This is a truly historic moment. These agreements have changed the game forever here in the United States and have the potential to change the game around the world,” US Soccer president Cindy Parlow Cone said at the time. US Soccer and the USWNT and USMNT players have reset their relationship with these new agreements and are leading us forward to an incredibly exciting new phase of mutual growth and collaboration as we continue our mission to become the preeminent sport in the United States.

When the FIFA World Cup kicks off in Qatar on Nov. 20 fans can expect a flurry of stats and match footage on social media and FIFA is hoping that includes data and content from a new player app. FIFA said on Friday that all players at the finals will be able to browse their performance data on a purpose-built app developed by the governing body which allows footballers of all 32 teams access to analysis and information.

While such data and metrics are widely available to players with the top clubs and national sides, who employ teams of analysts, the app will ensure squads with fewer resources also have access. The app will make use of input from FIFA’s performance analysts, tracking data and physical performance metrics such as distance covered, sprints and positional heat maps. Players will also be provided with photographs from the matches which they can share on social media along with stats and data.

This player-centric development is based on direct feedback from the players and is another great example of how FIFA is using technology to the best of its potential by improving the football experience for the key actors on the pitch,” said Johannes Holzmueller, FIFA Director of Football Technology & Innovation. Simon Colosimo, FIFPRO Deputy General Secretary, said players had asked for better access to their performance data.

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